Innovative verge cutting plan helps North Wales council boost the environment

A wildflower meadow has been created thanks to an innovative grass cutting plan.

Denbighshire County Council has reduced the depth and frequency of its cutting to an area of roadside verge in Rhuddlan, allowing more than 1.3 acres of wildflowers to grow.

More than 97 per cent of the UK’s wildflower meadows have been lost since the 1930s and protecting them is part of the Council’s work to support the environment under its Corporate Plan.

Cllr Brian Jones, lead member for Waste, Transport and the Environment, said:

“This approach not only ensures that council-owned grasslands are well maintained and safe for motorists but it also helps protect the environment.

“Plans are now being drawn up for similar work on sections of road in Dyserth, Ruthin and Llangollen.”

The wildflower meadow in Rhuddlan at Plas Lorna and between the cycle track and the road near Highlands Close includes interesting species like ladies bedstraw, tansy, and bee orchids.

The flowers are excellent for pollinators like butterflies and bees which are in steep decline in the UK.

Cllr Tony Thomas, lead member for Housing and Communities, said:

“A management plan has been created for these sites to ensure they will remain well-maintained and protected for biodiversity, creating thriving habitats in areas that were previously cut back. We have already been getting positive feedback from the public for this approach.”

The new approach is a partnership between the Council’s Countryside Service and Highways teams, following the Council being given Bee Friendly status from the Welsh Government.